Book the invisible sex james adovasio. The Invisible Sex : Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory.



Book the invisible sex james adovasio

Book the invisible sex james adovasio

In actuality of course, they did far more. Why do we all assume it was a man who invented the wheel or discovered fire making? Sep 28, Dennis Littrell rated it really liked it Very interesting and readable with some avoidable sexism J. Adovasio is an archaeologist. Olga Soffer is an anthropologist, and Jake Page is a science writer. They have put together in "The Invisible Sex" a book that attempts to 1 Bring the general reader up to date on the latest developments in archaeology or paleo-anthropology; 2 Uncover the True Roles of Women in Prehistory as in the subtitle ; and 3 Provide a corrective to a male-dominated view of the prehistory.

The main image they want Very interesting and readable with some avoidable sexism J. The main image they want to correct is that of the great male hunter bravely slaying mastodons and in general bringing home the bacon to an adoring and appreciative family or band. What the authors want readers to see is that women weren't just tag-alongs on the way to our becoming fully modern humans, but at least equal partners.

The authors refer to nets, threads, garments, basket weaving, cordage, digging sticks, the famous "Venus" statuettes, and other cultural artifacts to demonstrate the enormous role that women played culturally. They speculate that women invented farming, that they too engaged in the hunt, as well as producing works of art as important as the famous cave paintings. The main method used by the authors is to infer the past from a study of recent hunter-gatherer societies while comparing ancient artifacts with more recent ones.

This method certainly ought to provide insight into human life in prehistory, but of course there are some problems. The main one I think is that the "primitive" societies extant today or in the near past are not necessary typical of those that existed in prehistory because today's tribes occupy marginal lands since the best lands have long been given over to modern societies. Personally, I never had any doubt about the significant role females played in the history of the species.

Indeed, my feeling has always been that women are the default human being, and men an appendage, a necessary evil if you will. I don't think we need to study archaeology to understand that the central role in human culture is and was occupied by women. There is a sense of pandering and begging the question in the way the authors insist on the obvious.

I think it stems from the fact that women in some of the sciences have felt and still do feel like second class citizens. But that is changing. As the authors point out, most anthropologists today are women. The old male-delusional interpretations of culture in paleo-societies or in modern gatherer-hunter societies are a thing of the past. Instead we are in danger of having female-delusional interpretations.

Here are a couple of examples of "reverse" sexism in the text: The authors imagine that "Aboriginal men" may have sniffed "contemptuously at the shell hooks and On pages in pre-Columbian New Mexico: While the women were farming, "The men had continued to spend much of their time roaming the surround, hunting or goofing off? Frankly I am a bit weary of books that focus on sexualism in one form or the other to the exclusion of the science itself.

This book would have been a lot better had the stance been devoid of sexism and just concentrated on what the authors have learned and understand. Their various interpretations of the enigmatic Venus of Willendorf figurine, from goddess to porn star, is a case in point. Clearly the figure, which the authors quite naturally attribute to a female artist, is a symbol in some sense of fertility, not just the fertility of the female, but of the earth itself since no woman could have gotten so corpulent except during a period of plenty.

And that is what probably enamored those who made and kept such figures--the idea of the season of plenty. Such a woman not only had plenty to eat, but was a heavy favorite to survive whatever winter may come. Her personal sexuality is secondary to the generalized idea of fertility. As for bringing the general reader up to date on the latest developments in archaeology or paleo-anthropology, the authors provide some interesting material.

What has happened is that because of new technologies and more professional care taken by the scientists themselves, we are now able to unearth and be aware of artifacts such as threads, baskets, nets, etc. And, it is true, it helps to see these artifacts from a woman's point of view, that is, as a gender female looking at what happened and assessing the importance of the artifacts, and drawing conclusions that did not occur to the old guys who once dominated the social sciences.

Of course even better would be a balanced perspective, a fully human perspective, but we still have a ways to go to achieve that. Perhaps the most glaring omission in the book is the failure of the authors to mention war or what I like to call "the war system" as a reason for the rise of patriarchy during the transition from mostly hunter-gatherer societies to agriculture ones.

Before there were storehouses of grain and large settled communities, the profits of war were meager. Once war became a viable occupation, men increased their power over women. Indeed the current religions of the Middle East, Christianity, Judaism and Islam, are all warlike and patriarchal. So indeed, the authors do help uncover the true roles of women in the prehistory for those of us who had any doubt.

However, whether women went on the Big Hunt or not, or whether men ever acted as "midwives" which the authors identify as the real "oldest profession" is of secondary importance to the fact of hunting and midwifery.

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Book the invisible sex james adovasio

In actuality of course, they did far more. Why do we all assume it was a man who invented the wheel or discovered fire making? Sep 28, Dennis Littrell rated it really liked it Very interesting and readable with some avoidable sexism J. Adovasio is an archaeologist. Olga Soffer is an anthropologist, and Jake Page is a science writer. They have put together in "The Invisible Sex" a book that attempts to 1 Bring the general reader up to date on the latest developments in archaeology or paleo-anthropology; 2 Uncover the True Roles of Women in Prehistory as in the subtitle ; and 3 Provide a corrective to a male-dominated view of the prehistory.

The main image they want Very interesting and readable with some avoidable sexism J. The main image they want to correct is that of the great male hunter bravely slaying mastodons and in general bringing home the bacon to an adoring and appreciative family or band. What the authors want readers to see is that women weren't just tag-alongs on the way to our becoming fully modern humans, but at least equal partners.

The authors refer to nets, threads, garments, basket weaving, cordage, digging sticks, the famous "Venus" statuettes, and other cultural artifacts to demonstrate the enormous role that women played culturally. They speculate that women invented farming, that they too engaged in the hunt, as well as producing works of art as important as the famous cave paintings.

The main method used by the authors is to infer the past from a study of recent hunter-gatherer societies while comparing ancient artifacts with more recent ones. This method certainly ought to provide insight into human life in prehistory, but of course there are some problems.

The main one I think is that the "primitive" societies extant today or in the near past are not necessary typical of those that existed in prehistory because today's tribes occupy marginal lands since the best lands have long been given over to modern societies. Personally, I never had any doubt about the significant role females played in the history of the species.

Indeed, my feeling has always been that women are the default human being, and men an appendage, a necessary evil if you will. I don't think we need to study archaeology to understand that the central role in human culture is and was occupied by women. There is a sense of pandering and begging the question in the way the authors insist on the obvious. I think it stems from the fact that women in some of the sciences have felt and still do feel like second class citizens.

But that is changing. As the authors point out, most anthropologists today are women. The old male-delusional interpretations of culture in paleo-societies or in modern gatherer-hunter societies are a thing of the past. Instead we are in danger of having female-delusional interpretations.

Here are a couple of examples of "reverse" sexism in the text: The authors imagine that "Aboriginal men" may have sniffed "contemptuously at the shell hooks and On pages in pre-Columbian New Mexico: While the women were farming, "The men had continued to spend much of their time roaming the surround, hunting or goofing off? Frankly I am a bit weary of books that focus on sexualism in one form or the other to the exclusion of the science itself.

This book would have been a lot better had the stance been devoid of sexism and just concentrated on what the authors have learned and understand. Their various interpretations of the enigmatic Venus of Willendorf figurine, from goddess to porn star, is a case in point. Clearly the figure, which the authors quite naturally attribute to a female artist, is a symbol in some sense of fertility, not just the fertility of the female, but of the earth itself since no woman could have gotten so corpulent except during a period of plenty.

And that is what probably enamored those who made and kept such figures--the idea of the season of plenty. Such a woman not only had plenty to eat, but was a heavy favorite to survive whatever winter may come. Her personal sexuality is secondary to the generalized idea of fertility. As for bringing the general reader up to date on the latest developments in archaeology or paleo-anthropology, the authors provide some interesting material.

What has happened is that because of new technologies and more professional care taken by the scientists themselves, we are now able to unearth and be aware of artifacts such as threads, baskets, nets, etc. And, it is true, it helps to see these artifacts from a woman's point of view, that is, as a gender female looking at what happened and assessing the importance of the artifacts, and drawing conclusions that did not occur to the old guys who once dominated the social sciences.

Of course even better would be a balanced perspective, a fully human perspective, but we still have a ways to go to achieve that.

Perhaps the most glaring omission in the book is the failure of the authors to mention war or what I like to call "the war system" as a reason for the rise of patriarchy during the transition from mostly hunter-gatherer societies to agriculture ones. Before there were storehouses of grain and large settled communities, the profits of war were meager. Once war became a viable occupation, men increased their power over women. Indeed the current religions of the Middle East, Christianity, Judaism and Islam, are all warlike and patriarchal.

So indeed, the authors do help uncover the true roles of women in the prehistory for those of us who had any doubt. However, whether women went on the Big Hunt or not, or whether men ever acted as "midwives" which the authors identify as the real "oldest profession" is of secondary importance to the fact of hunting and midwifery.

Book the invisible sex james adovasio

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2 Comments

  1. In actuality of course, they did far more. Meadowcroft has been recognized as the earliest well-dated archaeological site in the Western Hemisphere, with evidence of human habitation dating to 16, years ago.

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