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Disco sex party candy samples

Disco sex party candy samples

Whatsername Susanna Hoffs Commentary: So, yeah, the main "remastered" download above is just the entirety of American Edit, and the broadcast version is the recording of the airing minus the mid-set commercial break. If you listen to that, you can hear me awkwardly talk around ownership of the thing, which is kinda dumb, but I was walking a very thin line there, posting stuff online illegally while legitimizing and publicizing it on LIVE who wished to continue a good relationship with Green Day.

So kudos to them for letting me play the whole thing. As far as commentary goes, jeez, my opinion of American Edit, 10 years later? Honestly, at the time, I really did like it, and I still do. Team9 did the heavy lifting, producing all the other tracks, and I really think they're stellar, especially the opener which is a rollicking tour de force of sampladelic mayhem. To me, the whole thing was both a joke and not a joke, a weird combo of parody and tribute and rebuke and makeover, and I still hear that now, listening to it.

Yeah it's sloppy at points and we were both so overwhelmed and hurried and busy that we finished everything as mp3s not even as waves so there's no like "clean" classic version to even remaster and share and it's not like it ever got Grey Album notoriety nor was it much like that album at all, which to my mind was a sort of DJ Shadow-style re-edit of The Beatles on which Jay-Z was kind of superfluous although awesome-sounding. But I feel proud of this little album, so much of it still makes me laugh the hand wielding a mouse instead of a grenade on the cover is like, the best idea I've ever had and even though Team9 and I have yet to meet in person Australia's so far!

I consider him a brother and a real trooper for sharing duties on this thing. Bonus broadcast version with intro comedy: Kraftwerk — Musique Non-Stop 5. Gwen Stefani — Waiting for Satisfaction Mixomatosis mashup 6. The Strokes - Juice Box 9. Kraftwerk — Computer Talk Party Ben mashup Riding on the high of last week's solid episode and playing a little bit of it as well , this episode suffers from repeat-itis, although it's bracketed by two fine productions from the delightful team of Phil n' Dog who if you listen to the on-air version you will understand were performing that weekend at our little Bootie club, thus the mega promotion.

I referred to Phil and his "partner" Dog in the post-show wrapup which apparently caused much giggling amongst the Brit crew who were listening. In between, the show is intermittently intriguing--the inclusion of Ad Rock's funky remix of Beck along with a dose of Kraftwerk over the top for no good reason is, well, something--but mostly kind of yawny.

It does contain the show's only appearance of Sublime, in a mashup that is miraculously actually quite enjoyable. Overall it's produced pretty well and stuff, so I'll give it a pass. On a side note, back here in , it's the day after horrific terrorist attacks in Paris, which is not really related to the Sixx Mixx in any way, except it sort of is.

First, thanks mostly to the patronage of DJ Zebra, I was lucky to have some of my mashups become somewhat known in France and then have the opportunity to DJ there multiple times. Various gigs took me to off the beaten path areas from tiny medieval hamlet Olargues to the Festival Francofolies in La Rochelle on Bastille Day, bien sur. I was surprised and humbled to find myself welcomed and treated seriously as an artist by interviewers and fans, and thanks to the kindness of fellow DJ friends and the music community I met along the way, I began to consider France as a sort of second home.

I didn't grow up romanticizing Paris or anything, but I feel immensely privileged to have been able to experience the country in this way. I've enjoyed some amazing live music events in France and have had some of my own favorite gigs there, and I can't help but think that if it had been a few years ago, there's at least a non-zero likelihood I would have been at this EODM show.

Of course, beyond all these coincidental threads, an attack on a music venue like this is deeply disturbing, not that concert attendees' lives are somehow more important than others, but that it represents an attack on expression, art, speech, culture, and the glory of shared sound experiences, one of the very few things that make life worth living.

I don't have answers, prayers, words of encouragement, or political messages here. I just felt like I couldn't post a show today without expressing how shaken and sad I feel about it, like everyone.

Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water 3. Beatles - Trippin' Up Jimmy Jammes mashup The Strokes - Juice Box Back to operating on all cylinders for the first time since January, really, this episode is solid front to back, as well as "cohesive" as they say on Project Runway.

It sticks to a sort of "cavalcade-of-mashups" theme, centered on the rock and roll, without getting too samey or dull; plus it's bracketed by debuts of early versions of two of my own productions that would become fan favorites.

Kicking off, I still enjoy the chug of Deep Purple over the stomp of the Gorillaz beat, and while segues in this episode are often quick slams, there are clever little tricks all along the way to keep the flow going. We get the debut of Zebra's pounding Foo Fighters mashup, and a crazy thing I totally forgot about: The Boom Bip rework of Hot Hot Heat kind of knocks the energy level off a bit er, a lot , but it's not a bad remix and was worth playing, I think.

And we finish with the debut of the obviously still in progress "Novocaine Rhapsody," probably the most difficult to produce mashup I made back in the day. Sure, the episode relies tellingly on Fatboy Slim, whose rockist, cheeky interpretations of dance music more or less provide the sort of sonic template for everything here, and that style was a bit out of date by , admittedly.

But overall, this is a sunny and well-produced show that stays faithful to the LIVE playlist while venturing far afield for interesting combinations and surprises. If I was the boss, I would have said, "Good job, let's do more of this," but six -ish more episodes later, the exact opposite would be said. That will be posted when we get to it. Depeche Mode — Precious Misc remix Coldplay — Speed of Sound C remix New Order — Blue Monday For some reason, I feel like Sixx Mixx episodes that were entirely at dance tempo ish or above were less successful than ones that moved around a little or stuck to slower tempos.

The Inner City vs. NIN is terrible, I will say that, and I'm playing more Depeche Mode because we were doing a ticket giveaway but that's doesn't really enhance the show. On the other hand, "Law New Order" is rightfully one of the most popular things I've ever played on the show, and still makes me laugh to hear it today.

So, for an episode whose clear intenstion is to, you know, make people happy, I'm going to give this one a pass. U2 - All I Want is You 5. Soul Coughing - Super Bon Bon 6. Nirvana - Heart Shaped Box 7. Naughty By Nature - O. Jumpside Party Ben mashup RX- White Lines Commentary: It's instructional to remember the heady days of late , when the anti-Bush drumbeat turned deafening and the context in which Team9 and myself were working on American Edit to fully understand how thrilling it was to me to discover that Gold Digger and American Idiot were in the same key.

That idea was pretty much my only contribution, from what I remember, to the first track from our little Dean Gray album, and I still look at Team9's work here in complete awe. His rollicking take on Idiot veers between glitch-hop, electro-metal and acid house, swirling with samples and references, and I just think it's really stupendous. Opening with these two "important" works seems to set a tone of, ahem, gravitas, for the rest of the episode, with the combo of Talk Talk and U2 appropriately somber, and Super Bon Bon with Heart Shaped Box aggressive and outraged.

The second half suffers from, well, being the same stuff I always play, but we end with an RX debut, smartly bracketing the show with George W references. This "White Lines" thing is almost incomprehensibly speedy, and I'm still sort of dumbfounded by how he was making this stuff so far ahead of his time. This episode of course doesn't hold a candle to Episode 62, the Election edition, which married politically aware tunes from various eras into a half hour show I'm still proud of today despite its turn from the usual Sixx Mixx insistence on musical connections above conceptual ones.

But Episode is still something, reflective of the crazy, angry times, and also, a teaser of the yet-to-be-released American Edit. Bonus download, broadcast edition: Gorillaz — Dare Soulwax remix 2.

Hoxton Whores — Sunshine white 4. Beasties Boys — Brass Monkey 5. Pinback — Fortress 6. The Kingsmen — Louie Louie 9. The Wiseguys — Start the Commotion Spencer Davis Group — Good Lovin' Pussycat Dolls — Untitled Aggro1 Mashup Much of this show, as the title indicates, comes from episodes 96 and 97, but as the story of the Sixx Mixx is sort of one of self-cannibalization for growth and improvement and remember, the show aired weekly, so playing the same thing a couple weeks in a row wasn't so bad.

Also I was lazy. So, the show starts with an edit of the highly enjoyable Soulwax remix of Dare, and then a "controversial" mashup, which is so transcendent in the verses you can almost overlook the key problems in the bridge and chorus.

After the rerun sections we get two coincidental mashups like how Hollywood always makes two of the same movie? Depeche Mode — Blasphemous Rumours 3. Missy Elliott — Lose Control 8. Green Day — Gwen Day Kro mashup Coming off the episode milestone one might expect the show to strike out confidently in new directions, looking forward to unexplored musical terrains. Instead, I put My Humps over Elastica.

But no, somehow it just doesn't come together, despite some segues that might have been good ideas before they were beaten into the ground. I don't mean to denigrate any individual remix or mashup -- Richard X is of course a genius, Slide's mix of Nirvana is a classic, and the various mashups are cool. And yes, I'm sure I was trying to be cheeky with the Humpy Connection, but the joke overstays its welcome by about three minutes. This is one of those radio things, where of course the Sixx Mixx wasn't just about mashups, and these mashups weren't "owned" by the Sixx Mixx, but for your th episode, you try and do something self-promotional that sounds official and have people vote on their favorite mashups and then you have a show.

Despite the fact that it's just 10 tracks with pretty rote segues between them along with the included voice-over production I actually kind of don't mind how it sounds, overall. I'd revisit the concept for the very last episode of the Sixx Mixx in just a few short months.

Anyway, even though this was actually a real vote, with a lot of people voting, I seem to remember, it embarrassed me to be at 1 on a chart on my own show. I talked to a couple people around the station about it and they were unequivocal that it was clearly 1 especially in the LIVE context and that nobody would think it was weird, but I still feel awkward about it. Anyway, it's 10 mashups.

Weezer — Beverly Hills Urbanix remix 2. Rihanna — Pon De Replay 4. Lyrics Born — I'm Just Raw a capella 5. Chambers Brothers — Time 7. Duoteque — Duoteque 9. Tweet — Oops, a Riot Party Ben mash-up Beatles — Trippin' Up Jimmy Jammes mash-up

Video by theme:

Whatever Happened to Candy Samples? - The Rialto Report Podcast 55



Disco sex party candy samples

Whatsername Susanna Hoffs Commentary: So, yeah, the main "remastered" download above is just the entirety of American Edit, and the broadcast version is the recording of the airing minus the mid-set commercial break.

If you listen to that, you can hear me awkwardly talk around ownership of the thing, which is kinda dumb, but I was walking a very thin line there, posting stuff online illegally while legitimizing and publicizing it on LIVE who wished to continue a good relationship with Green Day. So kudos to them for letting me play the whole thing. As far as commentary goes, jeez, my opinion of American Edit, 10 years later?

Honestly, at the time, I really did like it, and I still do. Team9 did the heavy lifting, producing all the other tracks, and I really think they're stellar, especially the opener which is a rollicking tour de force of sampladelic mayhem.

To me, the whole thing was both a joke and not a joke, a weird combo of parody and tribute and rebuke and makeover, and I still hear that now, listening to it. Yeah it's sloppy at points and we were both so overwhelmed and hurried and busy that we finished everything as mp3s not even as waves so there's no like "clean" classic version to even remaster and share and it's not like it ever got Grey Album notoriety nor was it much like that album at all, which to my mind was a sort of DJ Shadow-style re-edit of The Beatles on which Jay-Z was kind of superfluous although awesome-sounding.

But I feel proud of this little album, so much of it still makes me laugh the hand wielding a mouse instead of a grenade on the cover is like, the best idea I've ever had and even though Team9 and I have yet to meet in person Australia's so far! I consider him a brother and a real trooper for sharing duties on this thing. Bonus broadcast version with intro comedy: Kraftwerk — Musique Non-Stop 5. Gwen Stefani — Waiting for Satisfaction Mixomatosis mashup 6.

The Strokes - Juice Box 9. Kraftwerk — Computer Talk Party Ben mashup Riding on the high of last week's solid episode and playing a little bit of it as well , this episode suffers from repeat-itis, although it's bracketed by two fine productions from the delightful team of Phil n' Dog who if you listen to the on-air version you will understand were performing that weekend at our little Bootie club, thus the mega promotion. I referred to Phil and his "partner" Dog in the post-show wrapup which apparently caused much giggling amongst the Brit crew who were listening.

In between, the show is intermittently intriguing--the inclusion of Ad Rock's funky remix of Beck along with a dose of Kraftwerk over the top for no good reason is, well, something--but mostly kind of yawny. It does contain the show's only appearance of Sublime, in a mashup that is miraculously actually quite enjoyable. Overall it's produced pretty well and stuff, so I'll give it a pass. On a side note, back here in , it's the day after horrific terrorist attacks in Paris, which is not really related to the Sixx Mixx in any way, except it sort of is.

First, thanks mostly to the patronage of DJ Zebra, I was lucky to have some of my mashups become somewhat known in France and then have the opportunity to DJ there multiple times. Various gigs took me to off the beaten path areas from tiny medieval hamlet Olargues to the Festival Francofolies in La Rochelle on Bastille Day, bien sur. I was surprised and humbled to find myself welcomed and treated seriously as an artist by interviewers and fans, and thanks to the kindness of fellow DJ friends and the music community I met along the way, I began to consider France as a sort of second home.

I didn't grow up romanticizing Paris or anything, but I feel immensely privileged to have been able to experience the country in this way. I've enjoyed some amazing live music events in France and have had some of my own favorite gigs there, and I can't help but think that if it had been a few years ago, there's at least a non-zero likelihood I would have been at this EODM show.

Of course, beyond all these coincidental threads, an attack on a music venue like this is deeply disturbing, not that concert attendees' lives are somehow more important than others, but that it represents an attack on expression, art, speech, culture, and the glory of shared sound experiences, one of the very few things that make life worth living. I don't have answers, prayers, words of encouragement, or political messages here.

I just felt like I couldn't post a show today without expressing how shaken and sad I feel about it, like everyone. Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water 3. Beatles - Trippin' Up Jimmy Jammes mashup The Strokes - Juice Box Back to operating on all cylinders for the first time since January, really, this episode is solid front to back, as well as "cohesive" as they say on Project Runway. It sticks to a sort of "cavalcade-of-mashups" theme, centered on the rock and roll, without getting too samey or dull; plus it's bracketed by debuts of early versions of two of my own productions that would become fan favorites.

Kicking off, I still enjoy the chug of Deep Purple over the stomp of the Gorillaz beat, and while segues in this episode are often quick slams, there are clever little tricks all along the way to keep the flow going. We get the debut of Zebra's pounding Foo Fighters mashup, and a crazy thing I totally forgot about: The Boom Bip rework of Hot Hot Heat kind of knocks the energy level off a bit er, a lot , but it's not a bad remix and was worth playing, I think.

And we finish with the debut of the obviously still in progress "Novocaine Rhapsody," probably the most difficult to produce mashup I made back in the day. Sure, the episode relies tellingly on Fatboy Slim, whose rockist, cheeky interpretations of dance music more or less provide the sort of sonic template for everything here, and that style was a bit out of date by , admittedly.

But overall, this is a sunny and well-produced show that stays faithful to the LIVE playlist while venturing far afield for interesting combinations and surprises. If I was the boss, I would have said, "Good job, let's do more of this," but six -ish more episodes later, the exact opposite would be said. That will be posted when we get to it. Depeche Mode — Precious Misc remix Coldplay — Speed of Sound C remix New Order — Blue Monday For some reason, I feel like Sixx Mixx episodes that were entirely at dance tempo ish or above were less successful than ones that moved around a little or stuck to slower tempos.

The Inner City vs. NIN is terrible, I will say that, and I'm playing more Depeche Mode because we were doing a ticket giveaway but that's doesn't really enhance the show.

On the other hand, "Law New Order" is rightfully one of the most popular things I've ever played on the show, and still makes me laugh to hear it today. So, for an episode whose clear intenstion is to, you know, make people happy, I'm going to give this one a pass. U2 - All I Want is You 5. Soul Coughing - Super Bon Bon 6.

Nirvana - Heart Shaped Box 7. Naughty By Nature - O. Jumpside Party Ben mashup RX- White Lines Commentary: It's instructional to remember the heady days of late , when the anti-Bush drumbeat turned deafening and the context in which Team9 and myself were working on American Edit to fully understand how thrilling it was to me to discover that Gold Digger and American Idiot were in the same key. That idea was pretty much my only contribution, from what I remember, to the first track from our little Dean Gray album, and I still look at Team9's work here in complete awe.

His rollicking take on Idiot veers between glitch-hop, electro-metal and acid house, swirling with samples and references, and I just think it's really stupendous. Opening with these two "important" works seems to set a tone of, ahem, gravitas, for the rest of the episode, with the combo of Talk Talk and U2 appropriately somber, and Super Bon Bon with Heart Shaped Box aggressive and outraged.

The second half suffers from, well, being the same stuff I always play, but we end with an RX debut, smartly bracketing the show with George W references. This "White Lines" thing is almost incomprehensibly speedy, and I'm still sort of dumbfounded by how he was making this stuff so far ahead of his time. This episode of course doesn't hold a candle to Episode 62, the Election edition, which married politically aware tunes from various eras into a half hour show I'm still proud of today despite its turn from the usual Sixx Mixx insistence on musical connections above conceptual ones.

But Episode is still something, reflective of the crazy, angry times, and also, a teaser of the yet-to-be-released American Edit. Bonus download, broadcast edition: Gorillaz — Dare Soulwax remix 2.

Hoxton Whores — Sunshine white 4. Beasties Boys — Brass Monkey 5. Pinback — Fortress 6. The Kingsmen — Louie Louie 9. The Wiseguys — Start the Commotion Spencer Davis Group — Good Lovin' Pussycat Dolls — Untitled Aggro1 Mashup Much of this show, as the title indicates, comes from episodes 96 and 97, but as the story of the Sixx Mixx is sort of one of self-cannibalization for growth and improvement and remember, the show aired weekly, so playing the same thing a couple weeks in a row wasn't so bad.

Also I was lazy. So, the show starts with an edit of the highly enjoyable Soulwax remix of Dare, and then a "controversial" mashup, which is so transcendent in the verses you can almost overlook the key problems in the bridge and chorus.

After the rerun sections we get two coincidental mashups like how Hollywood always makes two of the same movie? Depeche Mode — Blasphemous Rumours 3.

Missy Elliott — Lose Control 8. Green Day — Gwen Day Kro mashup Coming off the episode milestone one might expect the show to strike out confidently in new directions, looking forward to unexplored musical terrains.

Instead, I put My Humps over Elastica. But no, somehow it just doesn't come together, despite some segues that might have been good ideas before they were beaten into the ground.

I don't mean to denigrate any individual remix or mashup -- Richard X is of course a genius, Slide's mix of Nirvana is a classic, and the various mashups are cool. And yes, I'm sure I was trying to be cheeky with the Humpy Connection, but the joke overstays its welcome by about three minutes. This is one of those radio things, where of course the Sixx Mixx wasn't just about mashups, and these mashups weren't "owned" by the Sixx Mixx, but for your th episode, you try and do something self-promotional that sounds official and have people vote on their favorite mashups and then you have a show.

Despite the fact that it's just 10 tracks with pretty rote segues between them along with the included voice-over production I actually kind of don't mind how it sounds, overall. I'd revisit the concept for the very last episode of the Sixx Mixx in just a few short months. Anyway, even though this was actually a real vote, with a lot of people voting, I seem to remember, it embarrassed me to be at 1 on a chart on my own show.

I talked to a couple people around the station about it and they were unequivocal that it was clearly 1 especially in the LIVE context and that nobody would think it was weird, but I still feel awkward about it. Anyway, it's 10 mashups. Weezer — Beverly Hills Urbanix remix 2. Rihanna — Pon De Replay 4. Lyrics Born — I'm Just Raw a capella 5. Chambers Brothers — Time 7.

Duoteque — Duoteque 9. Tweet — Oops, a Riot Party Ben mash-up Beatles — Trippin' Up Jimmy Jammes mash-up

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2 Comments

  1. Beautiful people make for amazing events, with even better memories and the staff love a great couple with fabulous personalities and a neat band Maleny Manor Thank you for a wonderful show. Will Smith — Switch. So, for an episode whose clear intenstion is to, you know, make people happy, I'm going to give this one a pass.

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