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How long will my labour last? Share Clare Herbert Community midwife Nobody can predict exactly how long your labour will last, but we can give you a rough idea of what to expect during the birth of your baby. If you're a first-time mum, active labour may take about eight hours.

This is an average, though, and it could be much shorter or longer than that. It's unlikely to last more than 18 hours. Once your cervix has dilated to 10cm, it could take you an hour or two hours of pushing before your baby is born.

If you've had a baby before, your labour will probably be far quicker this time around. Active labour is likely to take about five hours, and is unlikely to last more than 12 hours. It may take up to an hour to push your baby out, but often only takes five minutes or 10 minutes. Other factors can also affect how long your labour lasts. The strength of your contractions. How easily your cervix opens up dilates. How early you go into labour.

Premature births tend to happen more quickly. Whether you have an epidural , which can slow labour down. Whether you keep active during labour. Upright positions can speed things up. The position of your baby. If your baby's in a head-down position, facing your back, your labour is likely to be shorter. How calm you are. Staying as relaxed possible may help you to have a quicker labour and birth.

When does labour technically start? There are three stages to labour and birth. This starts with the early, or latent, phase. These are all signs that things are moving along, but your midwife won't consider you to be in active labour until your cervix is about 4cm dilated, and your contractions will be regular and strong.

Your cervix will be fully dilated to 10cm, and this is when you push your baby down and out into the world. This is when you deliver the placenta, and you can either have an injection to help it detach from your womb, or wait for it to happen naturally.

You may have friends or family members who recall their labours lasting two days or three days. Although this phase is uncomfortable, it's nothing like as intense as active labour and the second stage.

Bear in mind that early labour can be unpredictable. It may start and stop, or you may not even notice that you're in early labour at all. The first sign that your baby is really on her way will be strong, frequent contractions. This usually means that you're in active labour , and once you're at this point, your labour will keep going. This is why midwives and doctors prefer to time your labour from the start of active labour, rather than early labour.

The start of active labour can be hard to pinpoint, though. Active labour usually means that you're getting regular, strong, frequent, and long contractions. Your contractions are likely to happen every three minutes or four minutes and last for between five seconds and 60 seconds.

By this time, your cervix will have opened to about 4cm 1. When your midwife writes how long your labour was in your birth notes, she'll probably refer to how long it took for your cervix to open from about 4cm to 10cm.

At 10cm, you are fully dilated and are ready to start pushing your baby out. Every woman's labour is different, however, and you may not feel the urge to push when you reach 10cm, particularly if you've had an epidural. When you don't feel the need to push, even though your cervix has reached 10cm, it's known as the "passive" second stage of labour. This pause will be especially beneficial if you've had an epidural.

It gives your baby a chance to move further down the birth canal, making it easier when the "active" second stage starts. That's when your midwife will encourage you to push with your contractions or when the urge to push is so overwhelming that you can't stop yourself. After your baby is born, you're into the third stage of labour , when the placenta separates from your womb uterus.

How long this stage could take depends on whether you have a natural or managed third stage. A natural third stage could take up to an hour, while a managed third stage is expected to be complete within half an hour. But many women find it takes as little as 10 to 15 minutes, whichever option they choose. Occasionally, labour can happen really fast. This is more likely if you've had a baby before.

So trust your instincts. Listen to what your body is telling you, so that you can get the help that you need in time. Some babies just can't wait, however, and arrive before the midwife or paramedic! Read our step-by-step guide to emergency home birth. More on labour and birth: Should you shave or wax before giving birth? Our midwife has the answer.

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How long will my labour last? Share Clare Herbert Community midwife Nobody can predict exactly how long your labour will last, but we can give you a rough idea of what to expect during the birth of your baby. If you're a first-time mum, active labour may take about eight hours. This is an average, though, and it could be much shorter or longer than that.

It's unlikely to last more than 18 hours. Once your cervix has dilated to 10cm, it could take you an hour or two hours of pushing before your baby is born. If you've had a baby before, your labour will probably be far quicker this time around. Active labour is likely to take about five hours, and is unlikely to last more than 12 hours.

It may take up to an hour to push your baby out, but often only takes five minutes or 10 minutes. Other factors can also affect how long your labour lasts.

The strength of your contractions. How easily your cervix opens up dilates. How early you go into labour. Premature births tend to happen more quickly. Whether you have an epidural , which can slow labour down. Whether you keep active during labour. Upright positions can speed things up. The position of your baby. If your baby's in a head-down position, facing your back, your labour is likely to be shorter.

How calm you are. Staying as relaxed possible may help you to have a quicker labour and birth. When does labour technically start? There are three stages to labour and birth. This starts with the early, or latent, phase. These are all signs that things are moving along, but your midwife won't consider you to be in active labour until your cervix is about 4cm dilated, and your contractions will be regular and strong. Your cervix will be fully dilated to 10cm, and this is when you push your baby down and out into the world.

This is when you deliver the placenta, and you can either have an injection to help it detach from your womb, or wait for it to happen naturally.

You may have friends or family members who recall their labours lasting two days or three days. Although this phase is uncomfortable, it's nothing like as intense as active labour and the second stage. Bear in mind that early labour can be unpredictable. It may start and stop, or you may not even notice that you're in early labour at all. The first sign that your baby is really on her way will be strong, frequent contractions. This usually means that you're in active labour , and once you're at this point, your labour will keep going.

This is why midwives and doctors prefer to time your labour from the start of active labour, rather than early labour. The start of active labour can be hard to pinpoint, though. Active labour usually means that you're getting regular, strong, frequent, and long contractions.

Your contractions are likely to happen every three minutes or four minutes and last for between five seconds and 60 seconds. By this time, your cervix will have opened to about 4cm 1. When your midwife writes how long your labour was in your birth notes, she'll probably refer to how long it took for your cervix to open from about 4cm to 10cm. At 10cm, you are fully dilated and are ready to start pushing your baby out. Every woman's labour is different, however, and you may not feel the urge to push when you reach 10cm, particularly if you've had an epidural.

When you don't feel the need to push, even though your cervix has reached 10cm, it's known as the "passive" second stage of labour. This pause will be especially beneficial if you've had an epidural.

It gives your baby a chance to move further down the birth canal, making it easier when the "active" second stage starts. That's when your midwife will encourage you to push with your contractions or when the urge to push is so overwhelming that you can't stop yourself.

After your baby is born, you're into the third stage of labour , when the placenta separates from your womb uterus. How long this stage could take depends on whether you have a natural or managed third stage. A natural third stage could take up to an hour, while a managed third stage is expected to be complete within half an hour. But many women find it takes as little as 10 to 15 minutes, whichever option they choose.

Occasionally, labour can happen really fast. This is more likely if you've had a baby before. So trust your instincts. Listen to what your body is telling you, so that you can get the help that you need in time. Some babies just can't wait, however, and arrive before the midwife or paramedic!

Read our step-by-step guide to emergency home birth. More on labour and birth: Should you shave or wax before giving birth? Our midwife has the answer.

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3 Comments

  1. This usually means that you're in active labour , and once you're at this point, your labour will keep going.

  2. The position of your baby. The start of active labour can be hard to pinpoint, though.

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