Sex gone wild in europe. Rewilding Movement Seeks to Return Areas of Europe to Wilderness.



Sex gone wild in europe

Sex gone wild in europe

Comment The startled horses flinch when the gate of the corral opens in front of them. But with drivers approaching them from behind with waving arms, freedom seems to be the only choice left. After hesitating for a moment, the herd jumps through the gate and runs off into the distance to the applause of a crowd of onlookers. Diego Benito's biggest hope is that the newcomers will quickly reproduce in his reserve. He wants to hear the sound of thundering hooves.

Benito, a compact gamekeeper with a stubbly beard, manages the Campanarios de Azaba Biological Reserve, the new home of the 24 Retuertas he has just released. The reserve consists of about hectares 1, acres of fenced-in, hilly terrain in western Spain, along the border with Portugal.

In the past, farmers drove their pigs into the oak groves to feed on acorns in the fall. But it's hardly worthwhile anymore, which is why the horses have now taken over the terrain, together with "rewilded" cattle and a wolf that occasionally turns up in the area.

The animals can no longer count on human assistance. If they get sick, they die. If they can't find food, they starve to death. If they can't outrun the wolves, they are eaten. The 'Rewilding Europe' Project The project's goal is to recreate the kind of wilderness that has almost disappeared from Europe. A group of scientists led by Dutch conservation expert Frans Schepers has launched a unique experiment centered on the return of the large grazing animals that populated the Continent long ago: The scientists expect the greatest possible diversity of species to develop around the spectacular mammals, including insects, vultures, toads and snakes -- all the kinds of animals that were once forced out of their habitats by human activity.

Operators of nature preserves and activists across Europe want to be involved. Six areas have already been selected. They include the Danube delta, the Carpathian Mountains in Romania and the Velebit mountain range in Croatia see graphic.

The aim is to allow nature to return to its wild state as much as possible in each of these areas. The project is called "Rewilding Europe. A small herd of black-and-brown cattle with archaic traits -- high shoulders and narrow heads -- are now grazing in the preserve.

They bear a remote resemblance to the wild aurochs, the ancestor of almost all domestic cattle. The last of the aurochs, a species that once roamed throughout Europe, died in Poland in Efforts are now underway to "back-breed" modern-day cows to produce animals that resemble the original aurochs as closely as possible. Along with the aurochs disappeared most of the large mammals or so-called megafauna that had been living wild in the Old World. It is time to bring them back, says Schepers.

Large stretches of land are already virtually abandoned because they are too remote, the soil is poor or the terrain is too steep. More than , square kilometers 46, square miles , an area almost as large as Greece, will likely be abandoned throughout Europe in the next few decades, estimates the Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP. In many instances, cultivated landscapes can only be preserved when the last few remaining farmers are paid to keep the meadows mowed.

Large herbivores can do it for free. Schepers believes that their sheer voracity -- in combination with other forces of nature, such as fires, storms and bark beetles, provided they are allowed to proceed unchecked -- would prevent large areas from becoming scrubby and forested again. But is this wilderness? There also used to be steppes and tundra, flood plains and open grassland.

And that was long before man cleared the forests. Take the wisent, for example, a relative of the American bison. It is considered a forest animal. Since early spring, a small herd has been roaming the coniferous forests of the Rothaar Mountains in the western German states of Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia. But Schepers is convinced that the wisent is actually better suited to open landscapes, like the bison.

Only the constant pressure from hunters prevents the animals from venturing into the open. Open nature sometimes feels virtually depopulated, says Swedish photographer Staffan Widstrand, a co-founder of the rewilding movement. Not much is happening in the landscape, and to Widstrand, it feels like an empty theater.

A Bonanza for Residents, Tourists and Hunters The vision of the rewilding movement is to put the actors back on the stage. And when that happens, the hope is that paying audiences will return as well. Perhaps the day will come when people no longer have to travel to the Serengeti to marvel at grazing herds of hoofed animals and hunting predators.

Instead, they'll be able to see wisents in Croatia's Velebit mountains, for example, where the first of the bovines will be released into the wild next year. If all goes well, even hunters will eventually have their day. There will certainly be protected, no-hunting zones in the core regions; but if the animals venture into the surrounding countryside, they will be doing so at their own risk.

The sale of game could become a source of income for local residents. Even in the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, residents are beginning to hope for safari tourists. Conservationists want to convert portions of the delta of the Oder River or Odra River, in Polish into reclaimed wilderness.

The area has just acquired candidate status with Rewilding Europe. A biologically rich landscape extends around the mouth of the Oder, where it flows into the Baltic Sea, as well as parts of the island of Usedom and the Bay of Szczecin. There are already several conservation zones in the region. And wisents are grazing over in Poland. This is the only way private landowners could be convinced to participate, he explains.

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Sex gone wild in europe

Comment The startled horses flinch when the gate of the corral opens in front of them. But with drivers approaching them from behind with waving arms, freedom seems to be the only choice left. After hesitating for a moment, the herd jumps through the gate and runs off into the distance to the applause of a crowd of onlookers. Diego Benito's biggest hope is that the newcomers will quickly reproduce in his reserve.

He wants to hear the sound of thundering hooves. Benito, a compact gamekeeper with a stubbly beard, manages the Campanarios de Azaba Biological Reserve, the new home of the 24 Retuertas he has just released.

The reserve consists of about hectares 1, acres of fenced-in, hilly terrain in western Spain, along the border with Portugal. In the past, farmers drove their pigs into the oak groves to feed on acorns in the fall. But it's hardly worthwhile anymore, which is why the horses have now taken over the terrain, together with "rewilded" cattle and a wolf that occasionally turns up in the area.

The animals can no longer count on human assistance. If they get sick, they die. If they can't find food, they starve to death. If they can't outrun the wolves, they are eaten. The 'Rewilding Europe' Project The project's goal is to recreate the kind of wilderness that has almost disappeared from Europe. A group of scientists led by Dutch conservation expert Frans Schepers has launched a unique experiment centered on the return of the large grazing animals that populated the Continent long ago: The scientists expect the greatest possible diversity of species to develop around the spectacular mammals, including insects, vultures, toads and snakes -- all the kinds of animals that were once forced out of their habitats by human activity.

Operators of nature preserves and activists across Europe want to be involved. Six areas have already been selected. They include the Danube delta, the Carpathian Mountains in Romania and the Velebit mountain range in Croatia see graphic. The aim is to allow nature to return to its wild state as much as possible in each of these areas. The project is called "Rewilding Europe. A small herd of black-and-brown cattle with archaic traits -- high shoulders and narrow heads -- are now grazing in the preserve.

They bear a remote resemblance to the wild aurochs, the ancestor of almost all domestic cattle. The last of the aurochs, a species that once roamed throughout Europe, died in Poland in Efforts are now underway to "back-breed" modern-day cows to produce animals that resemble the original aurochs as closely as possible.

Along with the aurochs disappeared most of the large mammals or so-called megafauna that had been living wild in the Old World. It is time to bring them back, says Schepers. Large stretches of land are already virtually abandoned because they are too remote, the soil is poor or the terrain is too steep. More than , square kilometers 46, square miles , an area almost as large as Greece, will likely be abandoned throughout Europe in the next few decades, estimates the Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP.

In many instances, cultivated landscapes can only be preserved when the last few remaining farmers are paid to keep the meadows mowed. Large herbivores can do it for free.

Schepers believes that their sheer voracity -- in combination with other forces of nature, such as fires, storms and bark beetles, provided they are allowed to proceed unchecked -- would prevent large areas from becoming scrubby and forested again. But is this wilderness? There also used to be steppes and tundra, flood plains and open grassland. And that was long before man cleared the forests. Take the wisent, for example, a relative of the American bison.

It is considered a forest animal. Since early spring, a small herd has been roaming the coniferous forests of the Rothaar Mountains in the western German states of Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia.

But Schepers is convinced that the wisent is actually better suited to open landscapes, like the bison. Only the constant pressure from hunters prevents the animals from venturing into the open. Open nature sometimes feels virtually depopulated, says Swedish photographer Staffan Widstrand, a co-founder of the rewilding movement. Not much is happening in the landscape, and to Widstrand, it feels like an empty theater. A Bonanza for Residents, Tourists and Hunters The vision of the rewilding movement is to put the actors back on the stage.

And when that happens, the hope is that paying audiences will return as well. Perhaps the day will come when people no longer have to travel to the Serengeti to marvel at grazing herds of hoofed animals and hunting predators. Instead, they'll be able to see wisents in Croatia's Velebit mountains, for example, where the first of the bovines will be released into the wild next year.

If all goes well, even hunters will eventually have their day. There will certainly be protected, no-hunting zones in the core regions; but if the animals venture into the surrounding countryside, they will be doing so at their own risk. The sale of game could become a source of income for local residents.

Even in the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, residents are beginning to hope for safari tourists. Conservationists want to convert portions of the delta of the Oder River or Odra River, in Polish into reclaimed wilderness.

The area has just acquired candidate status with Rewilding Europe. A biologically rich landscape extends around the mouth of the Oder, where it flows into the Baltic Sea, as well as parts of the island of Usedom and the Bay of Szczecin.

There are already several conservation zones in the region. And wisents are grazing over in Poland. This is the only way private landowners could be convinced to participate, he explains.

Sex gone wild in europe

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