Spongebob squarepants gay sex cartoons. Queertoons.



Spongebob squarepants gay sex cartoons

Spongebob squarepants gay sex cartoons

The dynamics of same-sex desire in the animated cartoon by Jeffery P. Dennis On the treshold of the s and s there were many animated cartoons featuring same-sex couples like Hanna-Barbera's famous Yogi Bear and Booboo. The relationships between these characters were always kept vague and unclear.

Were they just buddies, relatives or lovers? Taking a long-term view on its history, sociologist Jeffery P. Spongebob Squarepants and his next-door neighbor Patrick, paired with erotic intensity Studio: Paramount Same-sex desire in Toonland. In the polarized, essentialized and sanitized worlds of movies and television, dreary recapitulations of hegemonic heterosexuality are the rule: The animated cartoon, however, has always carried the potential for subversion: The characters' fluidity allows not only for transgressive readings of gender roles, as Sam Abel argues, but implicit or explicit articulations of same-sex identity, behavior, and desire.

As Barthes notes, every image is polysemous, capable of practically limitless meanings; the author's job is to embed the image in enough context to delimit it meanings, to "fix the floating chain of signifieds in such a way as to counter the terror of uncertain signs" Barthes, But signs are necessarily unfixed, especially in cartoons, which build upon inference: For anything more subtle, audiences must contend with a series of vague, unstable, and often contradictory signs Condit, They are not permitted to construct any meaning, certainly; they construct likely meanings based on "a hierarchy of familiarity" Wilson, Before the 's, it was extremely rare for animators to deliberatly introduce same-sex desire into their characters or plotlines.

Heterosexual desire resided — and to a great extent still resides — in the very construction of sentient beings: But we do not require conscious intent. Dines notes that cartoons must be approached through three separate though interconnected areas: In sophisticated eras, animators can introject, and audiences can decode, overt signs of same-sex desire, and even specifically gay-identified characters.

But even when desire must be submerged into subconsciousness, and identities closeted to the point of invisibility, a cultural product is still "structured like a dream, a network of representations that encodes wishes and fears, projections and identifications" Garber, Bugs Bunny mocking and luring his antagonist Yosemite Sam Studio: Warner Bros Pre-Code animation.

In the days before the Hayes Code restricted potential themes and characterizations, animators frequently presented same-sex desire as an ordinary part of human — or sentient being — life; several cartoons based on the popular Krazy Kat comic strip portrayed the unequivocally male cat courting the unequivocally male Ignatz Mouse; and the Little Nemo in Slumberland, also based on an early comic strip, suggested, somewhat more subtly, that the intimacy between dream-wanderer Nemo and Flip, the cigar-chomping nephew of the Guard of the Dawn, transcended the more conventional quest to reach the Princess of Slumberland.

Same-sex couples occupied the backgrounds of flapper Betty Boop's adventures in Minnie the Moocher and I Heard ; for some reason, they were always ghosts. Betty Boop also frequently encountered stereotyped "pansies" several times. In Betty Boop for President , one of Betty's campaign promises is prison reform: While characters informed by same-sex identity all but vanished from the animated screen in , romantic or erotic desire is available to everyone, and present to a degree in every interaction, albeit often ignored or suppressed, and there are countless ways of imagining, modeling, and acting upon same-sex desire without expressing gay or lesbian identities; indeed, the imperative to present heterosexual desire as the only possibility has traditionally made gay characters appear as asexual, not interested in anyone at all.

Nevertheless, same-sex desire often intrudes into the cartoons of the 's and 's, in spite of every attempt to ensure that the characters were "really" heterosexual. Movie cartoons of the era were dominated by the Warner Brothers stable of continuing characters. There was usually no standard back story of biography: The ambiguity in personalities and relationships led, in spite of the Hayes Code, to moments of recognition of same-sex desire, as in the gay-vague mice in Tashlin's A Tale of Two Mice , or Pepe LePew's discounting of gender in romancing a faux skunk in Chuck Jones' For Scent-imental Reasons When they prepare to leave, they are presented with a bill which includes a service charge for removing "love spots".

One can only imagine what was meant by the term. Much has been made of Warner Brothers' characters' forays into drag. Sam Abel , for instance, believed that the drag routines of Bugs Bunny and others were "ways of addressing problems of masculine domination" and question gender roles. However, Bugs frequently engaged in transgressive behavior without adapting drag; for instance, after humiliating or evading an enemy, he kisses him full on the lips. This act does not transgress gender roles, since there is no "male" and "female" role in a kiss.

Within the context of the cartoon, it seems to signify that Bugs is is joking, that he has no malicious intent. It does not always work, of course: An object of ridicule, Elmer is ineffectual as hunter and easily duped into revealing his "true" feminine nature. Elmer's lisp is similarly a gay stereotype, just as Bugs' Brooklyn tough-guy accent recalls hypermasculinity. Hanna-Barbera Television cartoons of the 's and 's. Where no characters are specifically identified as gay or lesbian, we can locate same-sex desire in an interaction between two characters of the same sex which might elsewhere be coded as romantic, but is not an obvious parody of heterosexual desire: Cartoon dyads became the trademark of the Hanna-Barbera studios, which dominated television cartoons in the 's and 's.

Most baby boomers can name dozens of such partnerships, generally divided into apollonian and dionysian members, the one who concocts wild schemes and one who expresses the voice of reason: Other studios followed suit, with zoo residents Tennessee Tuxedo and Chumley , and most famously Jay Ward's Rocky and Bullwinkle , a moose and squirrel who, when not involved in witty adventures, participate as a couple in the civil life of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota.

Are these dyads friends? There is no definitive answer, as they transgress each of the permissible constellations of signs for same-sex dyads in the 's — and to a great extent even today. They cannot be mere buddies, as they share homes and take vacations together. They are not blood relatives, or coworkers, or antagonists. They present, in fact, contradictory or vague contexts that do not fix any particular sign, and allow for the reading that they are none of the above, that they are in fact romantic partners.

Yogi Bear illustrates the arguably erotic tensions inherent in the cartoon dyad. In the earliest cartoons, such as "Pie Pirates" and "Foxy Hound Dog", Yogi is an anarchic, Falstaff-like character involved primarily in outwitting the conformist Ranger Smith.

Boo Boo appears only occasionally to denote the bear community's disapproval of Yogi's antics. During the first season, Ranger Smith is gradually demoted to a minor nuisance, and Boo Boo becomes integral to the plotlines.

By the end of the first season, in "Lullaby-Bye Bear" and "Daffy Daddy", Yogi and Boo Boo are constant companions and domestic partners, sharing a cave and a bed. Have they fallen in love? In the second season, as if to defuse such a reading, the character Cindy Bear was introduced as Yogi's "girlfriend". However, she was mostly consigned to dropping hints and handkerchiefs, to batting her eyes while Yogi walked, oblivious.

She appeals to Boo Boo for seduction advice, and while the "sidekick" may well have known how to pique Yogi's interest, he offered only half-hearted and ineffective suggestions. Because he and Yogi were already involved? The same-sex relationship certainly triumphed over the incursion of heterosexual desire: Hipster Shaggy and Scooby Doo: During the 's, the increasing visibility of gay identities in the external culture added romantic partnerships to the conceivable codings of same-sex dyads; that is, many viewers had the contextual tools to speculate about whether the partners were "really" gay, forcing producers to defuse the possibility through continuous demonstration of heterosexual desires.

Some commentators have suggested romantic links on the long running Scooby Doo between female leads Daphne and Velma, [ 1 ] or between hipster Shaggy and the semi-coherent eponymous Great Dane Burke and Burke, ; and it true that the latter pair often hunted monsters together. However, they never shared a living space, engaged in social activities as a couple, or expressed any romantic interest in each other; they did have the habit of leaping into each other's arms at the first sign of danger, but such an action usually denotes cowardliness, not affection.

Schmidt finds a "homotopia" in The Smurfs , a group of small blue humanoids named after their primary personality characteristics "Hefty", "Brainy", "Clumsy" , because all but one was male, and because the Smurf named Vanity was a self-absorbed dandy who might be read as a homophobic stereotype. The back story reveals that an evil wizard created Smurfette to introduce discord into the all-male village; more likely the character was introduced specifically to provide an object for the Smurfs' heterosexual desire and defuse conjectures that they might be "really" gay.

By the 's, most cartoon characters had become aggressively heterosexual. Saturday morning afforded the gender polarized, girl- or boy-crazy alternatives of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe or Strawberry Shortcake , Lady Lovelylocks , or G.

A Real American Hero Characters whose relationships were amenable to romantic readings in a previous generation were either infantalized into asexuality — The Muppet Babies, The Flintstone Kids, A Pup Named Scooby Doo — or heterosexualized via marriage and parenthood. Popeye and Bluto replaced the passionate attraction that bonded them through violence and competition with singularly uninteresting but fertile unions, to respectively, Olive Oyl and someone named Lizzie Popeye and Son, Goofy, the erstwhile partner of Disney's Mickey Mouse, [ 3 ] transmutated into a single father with an eleven-year old son, and Mickey nowhere in sight Goof Troop, Even the revived Chipmunks , though children and therefore presumably excused from speculations about their gayness, played it safe by getting girlfriends.

Ren and Stimpy — not not gay Studio: Paramount Cartoons of the 's. In the early 's, animated cartoons began to make sly references to the presence of same-sex desire.

The trend began with Ren and Stimpy , an overt parody of the early 's cartoon duos, starring a manic, violent Chihuahua and a big, stupid cat. They reflected the Hanna-Barbera era of presenting signs without sufficient contextual markers to fix the dyads as friends, siblings, or coworkers, but with the added awareness that there was another possibility: Critics have similarly made much of the images of Ren and Stimpy as an overtly romantic couple.

They share a house and a bed; they reminisce about their wedding, and Stimpy gives birth to a sentient fart, a product of their sexual union Scolfield, In some episodes, Stimpy is a stereotypical 's wife, passive and nurturing, responsible for cooking, cleaning, and ironing Ren's underwear. Ren is socially and sexually the aggressor; in "Son of Stimpy", he tries to seduce Stimpy into the bedroom, but is rebuffed with "is that all you ever think about? They are instead presenting a parody of heterosexual relationships, supposedly funny because they are both men, yet one of them is acting like a woman.

Elsewhere, the duo may be read more appropriately as coworkers, friends, enemies, and house pets. Oddly, Yogi and Boo Boo present a more consistently gay relationship. While Ren and Stimpy allowed for an awareness of same-sex desire and even homoerotic activity, it is not until Pinky and the Brain [ 4 ] that we see same-sex identities coded into the cartoon duo. In early episodes, the intelligent lab rats shared a cage and collaborated on schemes to take over the world, but they were coded as coworkers and bunk mates, not as lovers.

Both had outside love affairs; Pinky was especially promiscuous, falling in love with a horse, a sea lion, and children's book heroine Pippy Longstocking. In the heterosexualization of same-sex relationships familiar from Ren and Stimpy, they went undercover invariably as husband and wife; in a cameo on Animaniacs, they scurry onto Noah's Ark with Pinky in a dress — Yacko as Noah sees through the ruse and is somewhat surprised, but only shrugs in resignation.

Erotic desire, however, is part of their relationship from the beginning. In a running gag, Brain has a sudden insight and asks Pinky "Are you pondering what I'm pondering? Let us go back to the lab and prepare for tomorrow night. What are we going to do tomorrow night? The same thing we do every night, Pinky. Ren and Stimpy, sharing a bedroom Studio: Paramount When Pinky and the Brain moved to prime time in , plotlines became more complex, with movie and television parodies and recreations of the basic scenario in various historic periods.

The writers also added what Warner Brother's head of programming referred to as "family and romantic elements" Stanley,

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10 SpongeBob SquarePants Episodes That WEREN'T FOR KIDS



Spongebob squarepants gay sex cartoons

The dynamics of same-sex desire in the animated cartoon by Jeffery P. Dennis On the treshold of the s and s there were many animated cartoons featuring same-sex couples like Hanna-Barbera's famous Yogi Bear and Booboo. The relationships between these characters were always kept vague and unclear.

Were they just buddies, relatives or lovers? Taking a long-term view on its history, sociologist Jeffery P. Spongebob Squarepants and his next-door neighbor Patrick, paired with erotic intensity Studio: Paramount Same-sex desire in Toonland. In the polarized, essentialized and sanitized worlds of movies and television, dreary recapitulations of hegemonic heterosexuality are the rule: The animated cartoon, however, has always carried the potential for subversion: The characters' fluidity allows not only for transgressive readings of gender roles, as Sam Abel argues, but implicit or explicit articulations of same-sex identity, behavior, and desire.

As Barthes notes, every image is polysemous, capable of practically limitless meanings; the author's job is to embed the image in enough context to delimit it meanings, to "fix the floating chain of signifieds in such a way as to counter the terror of uncertain signs" Barthes, But signs are necessarily unfixed, especially in cartoons, which build upon inference: For anything more subtle, audiences must contend with a series of vague, unstable, and often contradictory signs Condit, They are not permitted to construct any meaning, certainly; they construct likely meanings based on "a hierarchy of familiarity" Wilson, Before the 's, it was extremely rare for animators to deliberatly introduce same-sex desire into their characters or plotlines.

Heterosexual desire resided — and to a great extent still resides — in the very construction of sentient beings: But we do not require conscious intent. Dines notes that cartoons must be approached through three separate though interconnected areas: In sophisticated eras, animators can introject, and audiences can decode, overt signs of same-sex desire, and even specifically gay-identified characters.

But even when desire must be submerged into subconsciousness, and identities closeted to the point of invisibility, a cultural product is still "structured like a dream, a network of representations that encodes wishes and fears, projections and identifications" Garber, Bugs Bunny mocking and luring his antagonist Yosemite Sam Studio: Warner Bros Pre-Code animation. In the days before the Hayes Code restricted potential themes and characterizations, animators frequently presented same-sex desire as an ordinary part of human — or sentient being — life; several cartoons based on the popular Krazy Kat comic strip portrayed the unequivocally male cat courting the unequivocally male Ignatz Mouse; and the Little Nemo in Slumberland, also based on an early comic strip, suggested, somewhat more subtly, that the intimacy between dream-wanderer Nemo and Flip, the cigar-chomping nephew of the Guard of the Dawn, transcended the more conventional quest to reach the Princess of Slumberland.

Same-sex couples occupied the backgrounds of flapper Betty Boop's adventures in Minnie the Moocher and I Heard ; for some reason, they were always ghosts. Betty Boop also frequently encountered stereotyped "pansies" several times.

In Betty Boop for President , one of Betty's campaign promises is prison reform: While characters informed by same-sex identity all but vanished from the animated screen in , romantic or erotic desire is available to everyone, and present to a degree in every interaction, albeit often ignored or suppressed, and there are countless ways of imagining, modeling, and acting upon same-sex desire without expressing gay or lesbian identities; indeed, the imperative to present heterosexual desire as the only possibility has traditionally made gay characters appear as asexual, not interested in anyone at all.

Nevertheless, same-sex desire often intrudes into the cartoons of the 's and 's, in spite of every attempt to ensure that the characters were "really" heterosexual. Movie cartoons of the era were dominated by the Warner Brothers stable of continuing characters. There was usually no standard back story of biography: The ambiguity in personalities and relationships led, in spite of the Hayes Code, to moments of recognition of same-sex desire, as in the gay-vague mice in Tashlin's A Tale of Two Mice , or Pepe LePew's discounting of gender in romancing a faux skunk in Chuck Jones' For Scent-imental Reasons When they prepare to leave, they are presented with a bill which includes a service charge for removing "love spots".

One can only imagine what was meant by the term. Much has been made of Warner Brothers' characters' forays into drag. Sam Abel , for instance, believed that the drag routines of Bugs Bunny and others were "ways of addressing problems of masculine domination" and question gender roles.

However, Bugs frequently engaged in transgressive behavior without adapting drag; for instance, after humiliating or evading an enemy, he kisses him full on the lips. This act does not transgress gender roles, since there is no "male" and "female" role in a kiss. Within the context of the cartoon, it seems to signify that Bugs is is joking, that he has no malicious intent.

It does not always work, of course: An object of ridicule, Elmer is ineffectual as hunter and easily duped into revealing his "true" feminine nature. Elmer's lisp is similarly a gay stereotype, just as Bugs' Brooklyn tough-guy accent recalls hypermasculinity.

Hanna-Barbera Television cartoons of the 's and 's. Where no characters are specifically identified as gay or lesbian, we can locate same-sex desire in an interaction between two characters of the same sex which might elsewhere be coded as romantic, but is not an obvious parody of heterosexual desire: Cartoon dyads became the trademark of the Hanna-Barbera studios, which dominated television cartoons in the 's and 's.

Most baby boomers can name dozens of such partnerships, generally divided into apollonian and dionysian members, the one who concocts wild schemes and one who expresses the voice of reason: Other studios followed suit, with zoo residents Tennessee Tuxedo and Chumley , and most famously Jay Ward's Rocky and Bullwinkle , a moose and squirrel who, when not involved in witty adventures, participate as a couple in the civil life of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota.

Are these dyads friends? There is no definitive answer, as they transgress each of the permissible constellations of signs for same-sex dyads in the 's — and to a great extent even today. They cannot be mere buddies, as they share homes and take vacations together.

They are not blood relatives, or coworkers, or antagonists. They present, in fact, contradictory or vague contexts that do not fix any particular sign, and allow for the reading that they are none of the above, that they are in fact romantic partners. Yogi Bear illustrates the arguably erotic tensions inherent in the cartoon dyad. In the earliest cartoons, such as "Pie Pirates" and "Foxy Hound Dog", Yogi is an anarchic, Falstaff-like character involved primarily in outwitting the conformist Ranger Smith.

Boo Boo appears only occasionally to denote the bear community's disapproval of Yogi's antics. During the first season, Ranger Smith is gradually demoted to a minor nuisance, and Boo Boo becomes integral to the plotlines.

By the end of the first season, in "Lullaby-Bye Bear" and "Daffy Daddy", Yogi and Boo Boo are constant companions and domestic partners, sharing a cave and a bed. Have they fallen in love? In the second season, as if to defuse such a reading, the character Cindy Bear was introduced as Yogi's "girlfriend". However, she was mostly consigned to dropping hints and handkerchiefs, to batting her eyes while Yogi walked, oblivious.

She appeals to Boo Boo for seduction advice, and while the "sidekick" may well have known how to pique Yogi's interest, he offered only half-hearted and ineffective suggestions.

Because he and Yogi were already involved? The same-sex relationship certainly triumphed over the incursion of heterosexual desire: Hipster Shaggy and Scooby Doo: During the 's, the increasing visibility of gay identities in the external culture added romantic partnerships to the conceivable codings of same-sex dyads; that is, many viewers had the contextual tools to speculate about whether the partners were "really" gay, forcing producers to defuse the possibility through continuous demonstration of heterosexual desires.

Some commentators have suggested romantic links on the long running Scooby Doo between female leads Daphne and Velma, [ 1 ] or between hipster Shaggy and the semi-coherent eponymous Great Dane Burke and Burke, ; and it true that the latter pair often hunted monsters together. However, they never shared a living space, engaged in social activities as a couple, or expressed any romantic interest in each other; they did have the habit of leaping into each other's arms at the first sign of danger, but such an action usually denotes cowardliness, not affection.

Schmidt finds a "homotopia" in The Smurfs , a group of small blue humanoids named after their primary personality characteristics "Hefty", "Brainy", "Clumsy" , because all but one was male, and because the Smurf named Vanity was a self-absorbed dandy who might be read as a homophobic stereotype.

The back story reveals that an evil wizard created Smurfette to introduce discord into the all-male village; more likely the character was introduced specifically to provide an object for the Smurfs' heterosexual desire and defuse conjectures that they might be "really" gay.

By the 's, most cartoon characters had become aggressively heterosexual. Saturday morning afforded the gender polarized, girl- or boy-crazy alternatives of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe or Strawberry Shortcake , Lady Lovelylocks , or G. A Real American Hero Characters whose relationships were amenable to romantic readings in a previous generation were either infantalized into asexuality — The Muppet Babies, The Flintstone Kids, A Pup Named Scooby Doo — or heterosexualized via marriage and parenthood.

Popeye and Bluto replaced the passionate attraction that bonded them through violence and competition with singularly uninteresting but fertile unions, to respectively, Olive Oyl and someone named Lizzie Popeye and Son, Goofy, the erstwhile partner of Disney's Mickey Mouse, [ 3 ] transmutated into a single father with an eleven-year old son, and Mickey nowhere in sight Goof Troop, Even the revived Chipmunks , though children and therefore presumably excused from speculations about their gayness, played it safe by getting girlfriends.

Ren and Stimpy — not not gay Studio: Paramount Cartoons of the 's. In the early 's, animated cartoons began to make sly references to the presence of same-sex desire. The trend began with Ren and Stimpy , an overt parody of the early 's cartoon duos, starring a manic, violent Chihuahua and a big, stupid cat. They reflected the Hanna-Barbera era of presenting signs without sufficient contextual markers to fix the dyads as friends, siblings, or coworkers, but with the added awareness that there was another possibility: Critics have similarly made much of the images of Ren and Stimpy as an overtly romantic couple.

They share a house and a bed; they reminisce about their wedding, and Stimpy gives birth to a sentient fart, a product of their sexual union Scolfield, In some episodes, Stimpy is a stereotypical 's wife, passive and nurturing, responsible for cooking, cleaning, and ironing Ren's underwear.

Ren is socially and sexually the aggressor; in "Son of Stimpy", he tries to seduce Stimpy into the bedroom, but is rebuffed with "is that all you ever think about? They are instead presenting a parody of heterosexual relationships, supposedly funny because they are both men, yet one of them is acting like a woman.

Elsewhere, the duo may be read more appropriately as coworkers, friends, enemies, and house pets. Oddly, Yogi and Boo Boo present a more consistently gay relationship.

While Ren and Stimpy allowed for an awareness of same-sex desire and even homoerotic activity, it is not until Pinky and the Brain [ 4 ] that we see same-sex identities coded into the cartoon duo. In early episodes, the intelligent lab rats shared a cage and collaborated on schemes to take over the world, but they were coded as coworkers and bunk mates, not as lovers. Both had outside love affairs; Pinky was especially promiscuous, falling in love with a horse, a sea lion, and children's book heroine Pippy Longstocking.

In the heterosexualization of same-sex relationships familiar from Ren and Stimpy, they went undercover invariably as husband and wife; in a cameo on Animaniacs, they scurry onto Noah's Ark with Pinky in a dress — Yacko as Noah sees through the ruse and is somewhat surprised, but only shrugs in resignation.

Erotic desire, however, is part of their relationship from the beginning. In a running gag, Brain has a sudden insight and asks Pinky "Are you pondering what I'm pondering?

Let us go back to the lab and prepare for tomorrow night. What are we going to do tomorrow night? The same thing we do every night, Pinky. Ren and Stimpy, sharing a bedroom Studio: Paramount When Pinky and the Brain moved to prime time in , plotlines became more complex, with movie and television parodies and recreations of the basic scenario in various historic periods. The writers also added what Warner Brother's head of programming referred to as "family and romantic elements" Stanley,

Spongebob squarepants gay sex cartoons

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